Subject: an experiment with ephemeral URLs
From: npdoty@ischool.berkeley.edu
Date: 6/17/2016 05:34:00 PM To: friends from Berkeley and the standards/indieweb world Bcc: http://bcc.npdoty.name/

Friends,

I welcome feedback on an experimental feature, exploring ephemerality and URLs, or “ephemerurls”. Here’s the idea: sometimes I’ve posted something on my website that I want to share with some colleagues, but the thing isn’t quite finished yet. I might want to post the URL in some forum (an IRC or Slack channel, an archived mailing list, or on Twitter), but I don’t want the generally accessible URL to be permanently, publicly archived in one of those settings. That is, I want to give out a URL, but the URL should only work temporarily.

Ephemerurl is a service I’ve built and deployed on my own site. Here’s how it works. Let’s say I’ve been working on a piece of writing, a static HTML page, that I want to share just for a little while for some feedback. Maybe I’m presenting the in-progress work to a group of people at an in-person or virtual meeting and want to share a link in the group’s chatroom. Here’s a screenshot of that page, at its permanent URL:

Screen shot of the in-progress page I want to share

I decide I want to share a link that will only work until 6pm this afternoon. So I change the URL, and add “/until6pm/” between “npdoty.name” and the rest of the URL. My site responds:

Screen shot of the ephemeral URL creation page

“Okay, Nick, here’s an ephemeral URL you can use” Great, I copy and paste this opaque, short URL into the chatroom: https://npdoty.name/u/vepu

Right now, that URL will redirect to the original page. (But if you don’t see this email until after 6pm my time, you’ll instead get a 410 Gone error message.) But if the chatroom logs are archived after our meeting (which they often are in groups where I work), the permanent link won’t be useful.

Of course, if you follow a URL like that, you might not realize that it’s intended to be a time-boxed URL. So the static page provides a little disclosure to you, letting you know this might not be public, and suggesting that if you share the URL, you use the same ephemeral URL that you received.

Screen shot of the landing page with nudge

This builds on a well-known pattern. Private, “unguessable” links are a common way of building in a kind of flexible privacy/access-control into our use of the Web. They’re examples of Capability URLs. Sites will often, when accessing a private or capability URL, provide a warning to the user letting them know about the sharing norms that might apply:

YouTube screenshot with warning about private URL

But ephemerurls also provide a specific, informal ephemerality, another increasingly popular privacy feature. It’s not effective against a malicious attacker — if I don’t want you to see my content or I don’t trust you to follow some basic norms of sharing, then this feature won’t stop you, and I’m not sure anything on the Web really could — but it uses norms and the way we often share URLs to introduce another layer of control over sharing information. Snapchat is great not because it could somehow prevent a malicious recipient from taking a screenshot, but because it introduces a norm of disappearance, which makes a certain kind of informal sharing easier.

I’d like to see the same kinds of sharing available on the Web. Disappearing URLs might be one piece, but folks are also talking about easy ways to make social media posts have a pre-determined lifetime where they’ll automatically disappear.

What do you think? Code, documentation, issues, etc. on Github.

Update: it’s been pointed out (thanks Seb, Andrew) that while I’ve built and deployed this for my own domain, it would also make sense to have a standalone service (you know, like bit.ly) that created ephemeral URLs that could work for any page on the Web without having to install some PHP. It’s like perma.cc, but the opposite. See issue #1.

Cheers,
Nick

P.S. Thanks to the Homebrew Website Club for their useful feedback when I presented some of this last month.



Hi Kyle,

It's nice to think about what a disclaimer should look like for services that are backing-up/syndicating content from social networking sites. And comparing that disclaimer to the current situation is a useful reminder. It's great to be conscious of the potential privacy advantages but just generally the privacy implications of decentralized technologies like the Web.

Is there an etiquette about when it's fine and when it's not to publish a copy of someone's Twitter post? We may develop one, but in the meantime, I think that when someone has specifically replied to your post, it's in context to keep a copy of that post.

Nick

P.S. This is clearly mostly just a test of the webmention-sending code that I've added to this Bcc blog, but I wanted to say bravo anyway, and why not use a test post to say bravo?



I did make it to the Indiewebcamp/Homebrew meeting this evening after all, in Portland this time, since I happened to be passing through.

I was able to show off some of the work I've been doing on embedding data-driven graphs/charts in the Web versions of in-progress academic writing: d3.js generating SVG tables in the browser, but also saving SVG/PDF versions which are used as figures in the LaTeX/PDF version (which I still need for sharing the document in print and with most academics). I need to write a brief blog post describing my process for doing this, even though it's not finished. In fact, that's a theme; we all need to be publishing code and writing blog posts, especially for inchoate work.

Also, I've been thinking about pseudonymity in the context of personal websites. Is there anything we need to do to make it possible to maintain different identities / domain names without creating links between them? Also, it may be a real privacy advantage to split the reading and writing on the Web: if you don't have to create a separate list of friends/follows in each site with each pseudonym, then you can't as easily be re-identified by having the same friends. But I want to think carefully about the use case, because while I've become very comfortable with a domain name based on my real name and linking my professional, academic and personal web presences, I find that a lot of my friends are using pseudonyms, or intentionally subdividing

Finally, I learned about some cool projects.

  • Indiewebcamp IRC logs become more and more featureful, including an interactive chat client in the logs page itself
  • Google Web Starter Kit provides boilerplate and a basic build/task system for building static web sites
  • Gulp and Harp are two (more) JavaScript-based tools for preparing/processing/hosting static web sites

All in all, good fun. And then I went to the Powell's bookstore dedicated just to technical and scientific books, saw an old NeXT cube and bought an old book on software patterns.

Thanks for hosting us, @aaronpk!
— Nick



The Knight News Challenge applications are in and I find them a particularly exciting batch this year, perhaps because of a burst of activity spurred on by a handful of surveillance revelations you might have heard about. I read through all 660: below are my list of promising applications from friends and colleagues. I’m sure there are many more awesome ones, including some I already “applauded”, but I thought a starter list would still be useful. Go applaud these and add comments to help them improve.

Which are your favorites that I’ve missed? I’m keeping a running list here: https://pinboard.in/u:npdoty/t:newschallenge

Encrypt all the things

Mailpile - secure e-mail for the masses!

Making secure email (using the OpenPGP standard) easier by developing an awesome native email client where encryption is built-in. They already have an alpha running that you might have seen on Kickstarter.

Encryption Usability Prize

Peter Eckersley, just over the Bay at EFF, wants to develop criteria for an annual prize for usable encryption software. (Noticing a theme to these encryption projects yet?) Notes SOUPS (CMU’s conference on usable security, happening this summer at Facebook) as a venue for discussion.

LEAP Encryption Access Project: Tools for Creating an Open, Federated and Secure Internet

LEAP (leap.se) is a project for developing a set of encryption tools, including proxies, email (with automatic key discovery) and chat, in an effort to make encryption the default for a set of at-risk users. (My colleague Harry Halpin at W3C works with them, and it all sounds very powerful.)

TextSecure: Simple Private Communication For Everyone

TextSecure is likely the most promising protocol and software project for easy-to-use widely adopted asynchronous encrypted messaging. (Android users should be using the new TextSecure already, fyi; it basically replaces your SMS app but allows for easy encryption.) Moxie (formerly of Twitter) is pretty awesome and it’s an impressive team.

Standards

Speaking of encryption, there are two proposals for standards work directly related to encryption and security.

Advancing DANE (DNS-Based Authentication of Named Entities) to Secure the Internet’s Transport Layer

This one may sound a little deep in the weeds, but DANE is a standard which promises end-to-end transport security on the Internet via DNSSEC, without relying on the brittle Certificate Authority system. Yay IETF!

Improved Privacy and Security through Web Standards

My colleagues at W3C are working on WebCrypto — a set of APIs for crypto to be implemented in the browser so that all your favorite Web applications can start implementing encryption without all making the same mistakes. Also, and this is of particular interest to me, while we’ve started to do privacy reviews of W3C specs in general via the Privacy Interest Group, this proposal suggests dedicated staff to provide privacy/security expertise to all those standards groups out there from the very beginning of their work.

Open Annotations for the Web

Hypothes.is (with lots of I School connections!) has been contributing to standards for Web annotations, so that we can all share the highlights and underlines and comments we make on web pages; they’re proposing to hire a developer to work with W3C on those standards.

Open Notice & Consent Receipts

A large handful of us I School alumni have been working in some way or another on the idea of privacy icons or standardized privacy notices. Mary Hodder proposes funding that project, to work on these notices and a “consent receipt” so you’ll know what terms you’ve accepted once you do.

Documenting practices, good and bad

Usable Security Guides for Strengthening the Internet

Joe Hall, CDT chief technologist and I School alumnus extraordinaire, has an awesome proposal for writing guides for usable security. Because it doesn’t matter how good the technology is if you don’t learn how to use it.

Transparency Reporting for Beginners: A Starter Kit and Best Practices Guide for Internet Companies, and a Readers’ Guide for Consumers, Journalists, & Advocates

Kevin Bankston (formerly CDT, formerly formerly EFF) suggests a set of best practices for transparency reports, the new hot thing in response to surveillance, but lacking standards and guidelines.

The positive projects in here naturally seem easier to build and less-likely to attract controversy, but these evaluative projects might also be important for encouraging improvement:

Ranking Digital Rights: Holding tech companies accountable on freedom of expression and privacy

@rmack on annual ranking of companies on their free expression and privacy practices.

Exposing Privacy and Security Practices: An online resource for evaluation and advocacy

CDT’s Justin Brookman on evaluating data collection and practices, particularly for news and entertainment sites.

IndieWeb and Self-Hosting

IndieWeb Fellowships for the Independent and Open Web

I’ve been following and participating in this #indieweb thing for a while now. While occasionally quixotic, I think the trend of building working interoperable tools that rely as little as possible on large centralized services is one worth applauding. This proposal from @caseorganic suggests “fellowships” to fund the indie people building these tools.

Idno: a collective storytelling platform that supports the diversity of the web

And @benwerd (werd.io) is one of these people building easy-to-use software for your own blog, not controlled by anyone else. Idno is sweet software and Ben and Erin are really cool.

Mail-in-a-Box

Even if you had your own domain name, would you still forward all your email through GMail or Hotmail or some free webmail service with practices you might not understand or appreciate? This project is for “a one-click, easy-to-deploy SMTP server: a mail server in a box.”

Superuser: Internet homeownership for anyone

Eric Mill (@konlone) has been working on a related project, to make it end-user easy to install self-hosted tools (like Mail-in-a-box, or personal blog software, or IFTTT) on a machine you control, so that it’s not reserved for those of us who naturally take to system administration. (Also, Eric is super cool.)



IndieWeb folks,

While privacy was not the most common topic at #indiewebcamp earlier this summer, I think the independence of controlling one's own Web presence has a lot in common with freedom from surveillance.

In that spirit, I thought you all might be interested in the 1984 Day rally, taking place (after the Doctor Who live stream, of course) on the Embarcadero. The Web page for the event suggests, apparently without any irony at all, RSVPing on Facebook, but I thought an email/blog post was a more appropriate way to tell you all that I'll be there. Daniel Ellsberg (of the Pentagon Papers) will speak, among others.

Hope you're well and to see you soon,
Nick

P.S. Can you RSVP to an event within the description of an event itself? Test case: the paragraph above.