Subject: what i'm protesting for
From: npdoty@ischool.berkeley.edu
Date: 12/14/2014 04:32:41 PM To: noise@ischool Bcc: http://bcc.npdoty.name/

[Meta: Is noise an appropriate list for this conversation? I hope so, but I take no offense if you immediately archive this message.]

I’ve been asked, what are you protesting for? Black lives matter, but what should we do about it, besides asking cops not to shoot people?

Well, I think there’s value in marching and protesting even without a specific goal. If you’ve been pushed to the edge for so long, you need some outlet for anger and frustration and I want to respect that and take part to demonstrate solidarity. I see good reason to have sympathy even for protesters taking actions I wouldn’t support.

As Jay Smooth puts it, "That unrest we saw […] was a byproduct of the injustice that preceded it." Or MLK, Jr: "I think that we've got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard."

If you’re frustrated with late-night protests that express that anger in ways that might include destruction of property, I encourage you to vote with your feet and attend daytime marches. I was very pleased to run into iSchool alumni at yesterday afternoon’s millions march in Oakland. Families were welcome and plenty of children were in attendance.

But I also think it’s completely reasonable to ask for some pragmatic ends. To really show that black lives matter, we must take action that decreases the number of these thoughtless deaths. There are various lists of demands you can find online (I link to a few below). But below I’ll list four demands I’ve seen that resonate with me (and aren’t Missouri-specific). This is what I’m marching for, and will keep marching for. (It is obviously not an exhaustive list or even the highest priority list for people who face this more directly than I; it's just my list.) If our elected and appointed government leaders, most of whom are currently doing nothing to lead or respond to the massive outpouring of popular demand, want there to be justice and want protesters to stop protesting, I believe this would be a good start.

* Special Prosecutor for All Deadly Force Cases

Media have reported extensively on the “grand jury decisions” in St. Louis County and in Staten Island. I believe this is a misnomer. Prosecutors, who regularly work very closely with their police colleagues in bringing charges, have taken extraordinary means in the alleged investigations of Darren Wilson and Daniel Pantaleo not to obtain indictments. Bob McCullough in St. Louis spent several months presenting massive amounts of evidence to the grand jury, and presented conflicting or even grossly inaccurate information about the laws governing police use of force. A typical grand jury in such a case would have taken a day: presentation of forensic evidence showing several bullets fired into an unarmed man, a couple eyewitnesses describing the scene, that’s more than enough evidence to get an indictment on a number of different charges and have a proper public trial. Instead, McCullough sought to have a sort of closed door trial where Wilson himself testified (unusual for a grand jury), and then presented as much evidence as he could during the announcement of non-indictment in defense of the police officer. That might sound like a sort of fair process with the evidence, but it’s actually nothing like a trial, because we don’t have both sides represented, we don’t have public transparency, we don’t have counsel cross-examining statements and the like. If regular prosecutors (who work with these police forces every day) won’t actually seek indictments in cases where police kill unarmed citizens, states need to set a formal requirement that independent special prosecutors will be appointed in cases of deadly force.

More info:
The Demands
Gothamist on grand juries

* Police Forces Must Be Representative and Trained

States and municipalities should take measures so that their police forces are representative of the communities they police. We should be suspicious of forces where the police are not residents of the towns where they serve and protect or where the racial makeup is dramatically different from the population. In Ferguson, Missouri, for example, a mostly white police force serves a mostly black town, and makes significant revenue by extremely frequently citing and fining those black residents. Oakland has its own issues with police who aren’t residents (in part, I expect, because of the high cost of living here). But I applaud Oakland for running police academies in order to give the sufficient training to existing residents so they can become officers. Training might also be one way to help with racial disparities in policing. Our incoming mayor, Libby Schaaf, calls for an increase in “community policing”. I’m not sure why she isn’t attending and speaking up at these protests and demonstrating her commitment to implementing such changes in a city where lack of trust in the police has been a deep and sometimes fatal problem.

More info:
The Demands
Libby Schaaf on community policing
FiveThirtyEight on where police live
WaPo on police race and ethnicitiy
Bloomberg on Ferguson ticketing revenues

* The Right to Protest

Police must not use indiscriminate violent tactics against non-violent protesters. I was pleased to have on-the-ground reports from our colleague Stu from Berkeley this past week. The use of tear gas, a chemical weapon, against unarmed and non-violent student protesters is particularly outrageous. If our elected officials want our trust, they need to work on coordinating the activities of different police departments and making it absolutely clear that police violence is not an acceptable response to non-violent demonstration.

Did the Oakland PD really not even know about the undercover California “Highway” Patrol officers who were walking with protesters at a march in Oakland then wildly waved a gun at the protesters and media when they were discovered? Are police instigating vandalism and violence among protesters?

In St. Louis, it seemed to be a regular problem that no one knew who was in charge of the law enforcement response to protesters, and we seem to be having the same problem when non-Berkeley police are called in to confront Berkeley protesters. Law enforcement must make it clear who is in charge and to whom crimes and complaints about police brutality can be reported.

More info:
Tweets on undercover cops
staeiou on Twitter

* Body Cameras for Armed Police

The family of Michael Brown has said:

Join with us in our campaign to ensure that every police officer working the streets in this country wears a body camera.

This is an important project, one that has received support even from the Obama administration, and one where the School of Information can be particularly relevant. While it’s not clear to me that all or even most law enforcement officials need to carry firearms at all times, we could at least ask that those officers use body-worn cameras to improve transparency about events where police use potentially deadly force against civilians. The policies, practices and technologies used for those body cameras and the handling of that data will be particularly important, as emphasized by the ACLU. Cameras are no panacea — the killings of Oscar Grant, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and others have been well-captured by various video sources — but at least some evidence shows that increased transparency can decrease use of violence by police and help absolve police of complaints where their actions are justified.

More info:
ACLU on body cameras
White House fact sheet on policing reforms proposal
NYT on Rialto study of body cameras

Finally, here are some of the lists of demands that I’ve found informative or useful:
The Demands
Millions March Demands, via Facebook
Millions March NYC Demands, via Twitter
MillionsMarchOakland Demands, via Facebook

I have valued so much the conversations I’ve been able to have in this intellectual community about these local protests and the ongoing civil rights struggle. I hope these words can contribute something, anything to that discussion. I look forward to learning much more.

Nick



I see that work is ongoing for anti-spam proposals for the Web — if you post a response to my blog post on your own blog and send me a notification about it, how should my blog software know that you're not a spammer?

But I'm more concerned about harassment than spam. By now, it should be impossible to think about online communities without confronting directly the issue of abuse and harassment. That problem does not affect all demographic groups directly in the same way, but it effects a loss of the sense of safety that is currently the greatest threat to all of our online communities. #GamerGate should be a lesson for us. Eg. Tim Bray:

Part of me sus­pects there’s an up­side to GamerGate: It dragged a part of the In­ter­net that we al­ways knew was there out in­to the open where it’s re­al­ly hard to ig­nore. It’s dam­aged some people’s lives, but you know what? That was hap­pen­ing all the time, any­how. The dif­fer­ence is, now we can’t not see it.

There has been useful debate about the policies that large online social networking sites are using for detecting, reporting and removing abusive content. It's not an easy algorithmic problem, it takes a psychological toll on human moderators, it puts online services into the uncomfortable position of arbiter of appropriateness of speech. Once you start down that path, it becomes increasingly difficult to distinguish between requests of various types, be it DMCA takedowns (thanks, Wendy, for chillingeffects.org); government censorship; right to be forgotten requests.

But the problem is different on the Web: not easier, not harder, just different. If I write something nasty about you on my blog, you have no control over my web server and can't take it down. As Jeff Atwood, talking about a difference between large, worldwide communities (like Facebook) and smaller, self-hosted communities (like Discourse) puts it, it's not your house:

How do we show people like this the door? You can block, you can hide, you can mute. But what you can't do is show them the door, because it's not your house. It's Facebook's house. It's their door, and the rules say the whole world has to be accommodated within the Facebook community. So mute and block and so forth are the only options available. But they are anemic, barely workable options.

I'm not sure I'm willing to accept that these options are anemic, but I want to consider the options and limitations and propose code we can write right now. It's possible that spam could be addressed in much the same way.


Self-hosted (or remote) comments are those comments and responses that are posts hosted by the commenter, on his own domain name, perhaps as part of his own blog. The IndieWeb folks have put forward a proposed standard for WebMentions so that if someone replies to my blog on their own site, I can receive a notification of that reply and, if I care to, show that response at the bottom of my post so that readers can follow the conversation. (This is like Pingback, but without the XML-RPC.) But what if those self-hosted comments are spam? What if they're full of vicious insults?

We need to update our blog software with a feature to block future mentions from these abusive domains (and handling of a block file format, more later).

The model of self-hosted comments, hosted on the commenter's domain, has some real advantages. If joeschmoe.org is writing insults about me on his blog and sending notifications via WebMention, I read the first such abusive message and then instruct my software to ignore all future notifications from joeschmoe.org. Joe might create a new domain tomorrow, start blogging from joeschmoe.net and send me another obnoxious message, but then I can block joeschmoe.net too. It costs him $10 in domain registration fees to send me a message, which is generally quite a bit more burdensome than creating an email address or a new Twitter account or spoofing a different IP address.

This isn't the same as takedown, though. Even if I "block" joeschmoe.org in my blog software so that my visitors and I don't see notifications of his insulting writing, it's still out there and people who subscribe to his blog will read it. Recent experiences with trolling and other methods of harassment have demonstrated that real harm can come not just from forcing the target to read insults or threats, but also from having them published for others to read. But this level of block functionality would be a start, and an improvement upon what we're seeing in large online social networking sites.

Here's another problem, and another couple proposals. Many people blog not from their own domain names, but as a part of a larger service, e.g. Wordpress.com or Tumblr.com. If someone posts an abusive message on harasser.wordpress.com, I can block (automatically ignore and not re-publish) all future messages from harasser.wordpress.com, but it's easy for the harasser to register a new account on a new subdomain and continue (harasser2.wordpress.com, sockpuppet1.wordpress.com, etc.). While it would be easy to block all messages from every subdomain of wordpress.com, that's probably not what I want either. It would be better if, 1) I could inform the host that this harassment is going on from some of their users and, 2) I could share lists with my friends of which domains, subdomains or accounts are abusive.

To that end, I propose the following:

  1. That, if you maintain a Web server that hosts user-provided content from many different users, you don't mean to intentionally host abusive content and you don't want links to your server to be ignored because some of your users are posting abuse, you advertise an endpoint for reporting abuse. For example, on grouphosting.com, I would find in the <head> something like:

    <link rel="abuse" href="https://grouphosting.com/abuse">

    I imagine that would direct to a human-readable page describing their policies for handling abusive content and a form for reporting URLs. Large hosts would probably have a CAPTCHA on that submission form. Today, for email spam/abuse, the Network Abuse Clearinghouse maintains email contact information for administrators of domains that send email, so that you can forward abusive messages to the correct source. I'm not sure a centralized directory is necessary for the Web, where it's easy to mark up metadata in our pages.

  2. That we explore ways to publish blocklists and subscribe to our friend's blocklists.
  3. I'm excited to see blocktogether.org, which is a Twitter tool for blocking certain types of accounts and managing lists of blocked accounts, which can be shared. Currently under discussion is a design for subscribing to lists of blocked accounts. I spent some time working on Flaminga, a project from Cori Johnson to create a Twitter client with blocking features, at the One Web For All Hackathon. But I think blocktogether.org has a more promising design and has taken the work farther.

    Publishing a list of domain names isn't technically difficult. Automated subscription would be useful, but just a standard file-format and a way to share them would go a long way. I'd like that tool in my browser too: if I click a link to a domain that my friends say hosts abusive content, then warn me before navigating to it. Shared blocklists also have the advantage of hiding abuse without requiring every individual to moderate it away. I won't even see mentions from joeschmoe.org if my friend has already dealt with his abusive behavior.

    Spam blocklists are widely used today as one method of fighting email spam: maintained lists primarily of source IP addresses, that are typically distributed through an overloading of DNS. Domain names are not so disposable, so list maintainance may be more effective. We can come up with a file format for specifying inclusion/exclusion of domains, subdomains or even paths, rather than re-working the Domain Name System.


Handling, inhibiting and preventing online harassment is so important for open Web writing and reading. It's potentially a major distinguishing factor from alternative online social networking sites and could encourage adoption of personal websites and owning one's own domain. But it's also an ethical issue for the whole Web right now.

As for email spam, let's build tools for blocking domains for spam and abuse on the social Web, systems for notifying hosts about abusive content and standards for sharing blocklists. I think we can go implement and test these right now; I'd certainly appreciate hearing your thoughts, via email, your blog or at TPAC.

Nick

P.S. I'm not crazy about the proposed vouching system, because it seems fiddly to implement and because I value most highly the responses from people outside my social circles, but I'm glad we're iterating.

Also, has anyone studied the use of rhymes/alternate spellings of GamerGate on Twitter? I find an increasing usage of them among people in my Twitter feed, doing that apparently to talk about the topic without inviting the stream of antagonistic mentions they've received when they use the #GamerGate hashtag directly. Cf. the use of "grass mud horse" as an attempt to evade censorship in China, or rhyming slang in general.



Hi Kyle,

It's nice to think about what a disclaimer should look like for services that are backing-up/syndicating content from social networking sites. And comparing that disclaimer to the current situation is a useful reminder. It's great to be conscious of the potential privacy advantages but just generally the privacy implications of decentralized technologies like the Web.

Is there an etiquette about when it's fine and when it's not to publish a copy of someone's Twitter post? We may develop one, but in the meantime, I think that when someone has specifically replied to your post, it's in context to keep a copy of that post.

Nick

P.S. This is clearly mostly just a test of the webmention-sending code that I've added to this Bcc blog, but I wanted to say bravo anyway, and why not use a test post to say bravo?



I did make it to the Indiewebcamp/Homebrew meeting this evening after all, in Portland this time, since I happened to be passing through.

I was able to show off some of the work I've been doing on embedding data-driven graphs/charts in the Web versions of in-progress academic writing: d3.js generating SVG tables in the browser, but also saving SVG/PDF versions which are used as figures in the LaTeX/PDF version (which I still need for sharing the document in print and with most academics). I need to write a brief blog post describing my process for doing this, even though it's not finished. In fact, that's a theme; we all need to be publishing code and writing blog posts, especially for inchoate work.

Also, I've been thinking about pseudonymity in the context of personal websites. Is there anything we need to do to make it possible to maintain different identities / domain names without creating links between them? Also, it may be a real privacy advantage to split the reading and writing on the Web: if you don't have to create a separate list of friends/follows in each site with each pseudonym, then you can't as easily be re-identified by having the same friends. But I want to think carefully about the use case, because while I've become very comfortable with a domain name based on my real name and linking my professional, academic and personal web presences, I find that a lot of my friends are using pseudonyms, or intentionally subdividing

Finally, I learned about some cool projects.

  • Indiewebcamp IRC logs become more and more featureful, including an interactive chat client in the logs page itself
  • Google Web Starter Kit provides boilerplate and a basic build/task system for building static web sites
  • Gulp and Harp are two (more) JavaScript-based tools for preparing/processing/hosting static web sites

All in all, good fun. And then I went to the Powell's bookstore dedicated just to technical and scientific books, saw an old NeXT cube and bought an old book on software patterns.

Thanks for hosting us, @aaronpk!
— Nick



I'll try to make it tonight for Homebrew meeting. Maybe I can get "fragmentions" (ugh, terminology) or hypothes.is annotations on academic papers working beforehand.

Thanks,
Nick

P.S. While last time I RSVP'ed I worried that these irrelevant posts in my feed were needless, I ended up getting multiple emails with really valuable responses (about hiding certain types of posts and about the academic writing on the web project in general). So I'm persuaded not to worry urgently about hiding them from my index page or feed.